Learning that Connects the Classroom and the Real World

Educurious provides blended project-based courses that engage students in developing solutions to real-world challenges.

All of our courses are built to the Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards to help educators teach the skills students need for success in college, careers and life.

Our blended learning approach leverages an online platform to deliver curriculum and provide a space for collaboration. Educators, students, and experts team up on project work and incorporate 21st-century learning with today’s technology.

Using our courses, students shift from being passive consumers to active participants in their education. Learning becomes relevant through a constellation of connections to experts and real contemporary challenges—engaging students’ enthusiasm, creativity, and collaborative skills.

Explore our solutions:
Biology Units
English Language Arts (ELA) and Humanities Units
Environmental Science Units
ELA EduProjects
Math EduProjects
Science EduProjects
Social Studies EduProjects
Sample Units

  • Downloadable standards summaries give you an overview of each course and its alignment to standards.
  • Previews provide a look at the media supporting each course.
  • Prezis allow you to take an in-depth tour of each course.

Our courses are available for full year licensing (5 units in sequence) or as single units that can be used within an existing course sequence. Learn more about how our integrated solution can meet your school's needs or request a proposal by contacting us.

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Biology

Contemporary Approaches to Genetics

How can sequences of DNA help us understand problems related to species identification and public health? Students learn important ideas and concepts related to genetics (e.g., DNA structure, transcription, translation, protein synthesis, mechanisms associated with heredity, and inheritance). They employ various scientific practices, such as research design, data analysis, and formulating scientific arguments using evidence as they participate in a DNA project.

Project: Students complete background research on a species identification problem of their choice, design a DNA barcoding investigation, collect DNA sequence data, and then write a scientific abstract for their study.

The Ecological Impacts of Climate Change

In this course, students investigate the question: What are the ecological impacts of climate change? Students use online citizen science databases, Geographic Information System (GIS), and field and wet lab activities to investigate the ecological impacts of climate change and understand the tools and practices scientists used to study climate change.

Project: Students’ lab, field, and background research culminates in an infographic poster session that fosters authentic scientific discourse between student peers and experts within the community.

Environmental Health

From farms to cities, environmental contaminants impact ecosystem and human health. In this course, students explore a field of biology that affects all of us, and investigate the following question: How can we use plants and other living things to remove toxins from our environment? Students will strengthen connections between their everyday practices, their communities, and the environment, and learn about cellular and organismal structures and processes that help remove contaminants from the environment.

Project: Students carry out studies testing the efficacy of various species of fast-growing plants (brassica spp) in removing metals and other contaminants from water. They analyze and graph their experimental data and communicate their findings in a formal research report, which is critiqued by peers and experts.

Exploring the Diversity of Life

In this course, students will investigate the question: What can fossils and DNA evidence tell us about biodiversity and evolution of species? Exploring the Diversity of Life is presented as a mystery, in which students use fossil and DNA evidence to construct an argument for where to place whale species in the phylogenetic tree.

Project: Students work in groups to produce a scientific poster that explains their hypothesis regarding how many species of orca exist in the world. The poster will include written components in addition to a student-created phylogenetic tree to illustrate the evolutionary history of this group of whales, based on multiple lines of evidence.

Predicting and Preventing Infectious Disease

How do infectious diseases constantly outsmart us and continue to threaten human populations around the globe? This course is focused on ideas, concepts, and practices related to the study of infectious disease. Course activity draws heavily on various games (web-based, board games) that are models of different infectious disease concepts. During the course project, students select an infectious disease-related idea, concept, and/or practice and design a game that models it.

Project: Students design a game that models or simulates the infectious disease process.

English Language Arts (ELA) and Humanities

Approaching Amazing Art

How can art be a voice for social change? In Approaching Amazing Art, students read informational texts that examine social movements through the lenses of different artistic representations, such as graffiti art, murals, propaganda posters, jazz music, and poetry. Students look at how these movements and forms of artistic expression challenge us to consider how we think about the world around us.

Project: The unit culminates with a collaborative art project representing the students’ collective concern and commitment toward social change, evidenced by action research and declared in an exhibition statement.

Charting Current Controversies

How do you get people to listen to your opinion on topics that matter to you? In Charting Current Controversies, students develop sound arguments and informed opinions using a wide variety of resources from digital texts and videos to books and magazines. At its core, the course has students reflect on why some opinions are taken up by audiences and thought of as sound, while other opinions go unheard or are dismissed as irrelevant, superficial, unwarranted, or emotional.

Project: Students transform their formal written arguments based on classical structure into a publishable format suitable to an op-ed page or a radio show.

Imagining New Worlds

Dystopian authors have had a disturbingly accurate track record of predicting the future of society. In Imagining New Worlds, students consider the question: What can we learn about ourselves and our society from dystopian worlds? Students study authors’ varied approaches to dystopian literature and common dystopian literary conventions.

Project: Students create a graphic novel or produce a short film set in a dystopian world and modeled on a social issue important to the students.

Investigating Science through Story

Science literacy is an important component of lifelong science learning, sense making, and critique. How do we make complex and current science content relevant, accessible, and personal? Students will deconstruct the genre of science narrative, a type of creative nonfiction (CNF), through reading Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks and other articles.

Project: Students complete a 500-800 word CNF piece and transform it into a magazine layout for an article to be published in a class ’zine, or a vod/podcast inspired by NPR’s Science Friday, an infographic, or a children’s book.

Mining Personal Histories

How do social and cultural influences shape our lives? In this course, students will read, analyze, discuss, and write nonfiction; they will craft nonfiction stories of people in their community; and they will present those stories to the world.

Project: Students’ culminating project, completed with significant input from classmates, the teacher, and local experts, will be a written documentary proposal and a video documentary presenting the nonfiction story of a community member they have interviewed and researched.

This course is available as a free mini-unit and as part of our integrated solution.

Picking Up the Clues

How do writers and film directors bring readers and audiences to the edge of their seats, making them want to read and watch on? Picking Up the Clues exposes students to the work of Edgar Allan Poe, unlocking strategies for approaching challenging texts and revealing how Poe’s work has influenced suspense-filled genres today. Students analyze how suspense is constructed in contemporary and classical fiction, and then infuse suspense into their own creative projects.

Project: The final project, the crafting of a graphic novel, builds on the knowledge and skills developed during the study of suspense. Students take one of their short stories, a work from Poe, or a chapter from their outside reading, and transform the most suspenseful segment into a script format that is then adapted into a graphic short story.

Environmental Science

Earth Processes: The Basis for Life

Natural forces are continually transforming the materials of the Earth’s crust from one rock type to another. Physical properties and appearance of the rock give clues to its geological history. Relative position of rocks in strata provides clues which help us infer the age and sequence of events. How are rocks and landscapes formed? How does the physical earth support ecosystems? How can we use clues to solve a geological mystery?

Project: In this unit, students will create a cake that tells a geologic story. They will experiment with different ingredients and cooking processes to represent igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks and processes that form each. Finally, they’ll hold a geology bakeoff and review in which they describe the story behind each other’s cakes and critique others interpretation of their own.

Environmental Health

From farms to cities, environmental contaminants impact ecosystem and human health. In this course, students explore a field of biology that affects all of us, and investigate the following question: How can we use plants and other living things to remove toxins from our environment? Students will strengthen connections between their everyday practices, their communities, and the environment, and learn about cellular and organismal structures and processes that help remove contaminants from the environment.

Project: Students carry out studies testing the efficacy of various species of fast-growing plants (brassica spp) in removing metals and other contaminants from water. They analyze and graph their experimental data and communicate their findings in a formal research report, which is critiqued by peers and experts.

Changing Communities and Population

Due to human actions, both intentional and accidental, ecosystems around the world are changing rapidly. This unit considers the complexities of patterns in populations of organisms within a community. Students will investigate factors that determine whether populations grow or decline, as well as when these changes become an environmental concern. They will explore the essential question: “How do populations change over time and what are the impacts?” By studying shifting communities and populations, students will come to understand how the fragility and elasticity of ecosystems relates to their own actions, their communities, and organisms in their own backyard.

Project: Students identify and research a local organism of their choice—perhaps an endangered, threatened, or invasive species—and create a remediation plan to share to a larger audience.

The Ecological Impacts of Climate Change

In this course, students investigate the question: What are the ecological impacts of climate change? Students use online citizen science databases, Geographic Information System (GIS), and field and wet lab activities to investigate the ecological impacts of climate change and understand the tools and practices scientists used to study climate change.

Project: Students’ lab, field, and background research culminates in an infographic poster session that fosters authentic scientific discourse between student peers and experts within the community.

Going Green

Many forces have combined to encourage (and in some places, require) recycling and energy conservation. These forces include the cost and availability of raw materials; and the costs and effects of energy extraction, production, and transportation. Also important in the push to recycle and conserve energy is the aim to leave our communities and the world in as clean and pollution-free a state as possible for future generations. How sustainable is your school? How does math inform an environmental analysis?

Project: After researching energy usage and recycling plans, students audit their school's energy usage, recycling practices, or other pressing environmental problem. They present their written audit report to the school and invited guests with a companion multimedia presentation format.

Free Mini-Units

The Hunger Games Challenge

Free

In this free mini-unit, students use evidence from the text to infer what might have led to Panem, the postapocalyptic world of The Hunger Games. Students use primary source documents to support their analyses; inform others about what they've learned; and check in with experts in the field.

Project: Students will write an informative essay analyzing the evidence of a social, political, or environmental issue that may have led to Katniss' world.

Mining Personal Histories

Free

How do social and cultural influences shape our lives? In this course, students will read, analyze, discuss, and write nonfiction; they will craft nonfiction stories of people in their community; and they will present those stories to the world.

Project: Students’ culminating project, completed with significant input from classmates, the teacher, and local experts, will be a written documentary proposal and a video documentary presenting the nonfiction story of a community member they have interviewed and researched.

This course is available as a free mini-unit and as part of our integrated solution.

Connect With Us

Educurious is making a difference to thousands of students across the country.

Together, we can create a 21st-century education that keeps students engaged and in high school—gaining the critical skills for success in college, careers, and life. Let us help you transform your classroom today.
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